Job Fact Friday: Social Media

Social media is quickly becoming the new job search tool. Generation Y has made social media such a large part of their lives that companies are picking up this trend and posting jobs on social media websites. Common ones include Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google Plus. So the next time you’re browsing online, make sure you don’t neglect the job postings on social media. They’re just as legitimate as the jobs that are posted on other online job boards or the career section in newspapers and magazines.

Should I Apply to a Job if I Don’t Have Experience?

It happens so often that people miss a job opportunity because they actually don’t’ have the qualifications listed don’t have the qualifications or experience listed on the job posting so they don’t apply. Well NEWS FLASH! All the requirements and experience listed on the ad just make up a “wish list” for employers. They may not expect a candidate to have all those qualifications but still list them to weave out anyone who is not 100% qualified for the position.

An easy rule to remember is that if you have more than 50% of the qualifications and experience listed in the posting, you should apply. Most employers are willing to train new candidates and make exceptions if the qualifications and experience are very easy to learn.

However, don’t apply to a job if there is a very specific and mandatory education or skill requirement that you don’t have. The bottom line is to apply even if you think you don’t have experience but feel like you can confidently take on the role.

Transferable skills are an asset

After going through a good amount of schooling and having some work experience under your belt, there have got to be some skills you already have which can be transferred over to the job you want to apply to.

Work-related experience: See if the skills you’ve picked up during your previous work experiences can be applied to the job. For example, if you were a leader of six people and the job ad requires a supervisor to oversee 10 people, you still have the potential to become a supervisor because: a) You were already in a role that required some kind of leadership of others b) You know a thing or two about managing others, even if it’s less than the amount in the job ad.

Breaking into different industries: Breaking into a different industry can also work because employers might want new insight in the company. If you are an accountant and want to work in a payroll company, they might take a second look at you because the skills of an accountant are similar to payroll positions.

Your cover letter will support your “no/lack of experience”

Like we mentioned before, your cover letter can make or break your chances at getting the job. So even if you don’t have the exact experience they’re looking for, use your cover letter to highlight the experiences you do have that would make you an asset to their company.

Convince the employer: This goes back to thinking about all the transferable skills you have. If you write your cover letter well, you will have the hiring manager sold on the fact that even if you don’t have experience, you do have the skills. In the letter, talk about how your skills can be applied to the role and how you can benefit the company as a whole.

Show your knowledge for the position/industry: Do your research on the position or industry you are applying for so you know the key points to hit when writing the cover letter. That knowledge may make the difference between an interview and being passed over for one.

Maybe You’ll Get Lucky

You never know what is going on in the minds of hiring managers and their intentions for the company. Maybe they want someone who isn’t familiar with the industry to bring in new perspectives. Or they like your resume and cover letter so much that they are willing to offer you an interview. The possibilities are endless. Applying for a job even if you don’t have exact experience doesn’t hurt but it certainly does increase your chances at a job offer than not submitting one at all.

 

Tip Tuesdays: Job Interview Dos & Don’ts

It’s the little things that count. Employers notice everything you do from the minute you walk into the interview to when you step out. They’re taking notes of everything you say and do during the job interview so make sire you follow these steps to ensure professionalism!

 

Motivation Monday: Lupita Nyong’o

“No matter where you are, your dreams are valid” – Lupita Nyong’o 

Lupita Nyong’o delivered one of the most empowering and inspiring speeches after she received an Oscar for best supporting actress in “12 Years a Slave” on Mar. 2. Her words were truly motivating and really solidified the fact that dreams do become reality if you put your time into whatever it is you desire.

5 Ways to Impress Recruiters

Just a heads up, if you think you only need to impress the hiring manager to get a job, think again. It’s very important to also make a good impression with the recruiter who is calling you back to potentially schedule you in for an interview. However, candidates sometimes overlook the importance of this and as a result, lose a great opportunity.

Think of it like a football game. In order to get to the quarterback (hiring manager), you have to past the defensive linemen (recruiters) first. If you can’t get past the defense, you can’t get to the quarterback and end up giving the other team an opportunity to make a touchdown. In other words, you risk someone else getting the job over you.

Here are five things to do/say to convince the hiring manager that you’re deserving of a job.

1) Update your resume:
Right here at The Job Window, we’ve had a number of occasions where the recruiter is going over the resume with a candidate over the phone and that’s when the candidate realizes their resume is out of date. For example, the word “present” is written beside a job the candidate no longer has. At that point, a million things go through the recruiter’s mind: “Is this candidate blindly sending out resumes to every job post they see?” “They don’t pay attention to detail,” or worse “They don’t care”. These are all impressions that can hurt you as a job seeker. Again, first impressions are key and not updating your resume makes a bad first impression.

2) Be conversational:
In other words, don’t give one-worded answers – it shows disinterest in the job. Even if you’re not a very conversational person, pretend you are and be interpersonal. Speak to the recruiter as if they’re you’re friend. Try to elaborate on your answers as much as possible and make them like you. Without knowing it, you may be developing a personal, but professional relationship with them – which will work to your advantage.

3) Make it seem like you really want the job:
Recruiters hate it when they call a candidate and ask, “Hi, is this a good time to talk?” and the candidate says, “No, can you call me back later?” with no explanation. Right off the bat, the recruiter will perceive the person as rude and disinterested. If you really want the job, you should make an effort to call the recruiter back. They’re not going to chase after you when they’ve got hundreds of other candidates who’d gladly take your place.

Instead, say: “I’m driving right now, can I please call you back when I pull over?” Recruiters understand that they might be catching you at a bad time. So if you tell them that you’ll call them back, they’ll appreciate it.

4) Speak to recruiters in a quiet area:
Do you ever find it annoying when you can’t hear someone on the other line? Or when you’re trying to speak to them and they’re distracted by something? Well, recruiters feel the same way. Just like in the previous situation, explain to them that you will call them back once you find a quieter place. That way, you can express your interest and reiterate your skills clearly, on the way to the recruiter scheduling you in for an interview.

5) Be prepared for the call:
After applying for a position, give everyone in your household a heads up that you may be expecting a call from an employer. Recruiters find it unprofessional when you or someone else answers the phone in a improper manner such as “yo, sup” or “hello” in an annoyed tone of voice. It’s all about first impressions, so perk up and expect every call to be the employer or recruiter.

Final tips:

  • Be polite
  • Sound enthusiastic and interpersonal
  • Keep your resume updated and honest

Remember, first impressions are everything. And just because the recruiter doesn’t have the power to hire you, they still have the ability to give the hiring manager that first impression about you, whether it’s good or bad.

Lets Talk Salary…

The burning question…”What are your salary expectations?”

You’d be surprised how many people don’t know how to answer this question. Two reasons: 1) Money-talk is awkward no matter what.  2) Fear of rejection if given too high or too low of a number.

No matter what, the salary question will always be awkward. There’s no right or wrong answer but it’s important to prepare for it if you want to be valued for your skills and past accomplishments.

Here are some suggestions to answer the tough salary question with confidence in an interview.

What not to do when asked about salary

Never say, “I don’t know”: Just like with any other interview question, you never want to give the impression that you’re clueless. This shows that you’re not prepared and didn’t do your research. Saying “I don’t know” in general is an opening to a disastrous interview.

Never say, “It’s up to you or “whatever you want to give me”: Employers can take this two ways: either you have low expectations of their company or you’re a pushover. And obviously you don’t’ want them to think either of that. When you say “It’s up to you” or “whatever you want to give me”, you’re giving the employer control and leeway to give you whatever they please – and this can backfire because some employers can take advantage of this and underpay you.

What to do when asked about salary

Research the position/field you are interviewing for to get a clear understanding: To avoid all those statements above, it doesn’t come any clearer – DO YOUR RESEARCH! You’re looking up interview questions and preparing for the interview anyway. So why not find out the average salary/hourly wage that people in that position are currently making? Glassdoor.com or your country’s government website is the best way to find this. Try to study the annual trends and how it has increased or decreased over the years and months.

Always give a range, not an exact salary number: After conducting some research on how much people in your industry and position get annually, monthly and hourly, come up with a range between five and ten. For example, you can say between $15 to $20/hour or $40,000 to $50,00 a year depending on experience. This will allow the interviewer to have some leeway with you and reach a middle ground.

Use your common sense: Be smart and know the level of your position. Don’t expect a ridiculous amount of money if you are applying for a junior position. For example, IT positions can make over $100,000 a year, but not when they first start out. So be reasonable.