Resume Writing for Beginners (Part 1): Resume Formats & Fonts

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If you’re applying to your first job and you have no idea how to begin writing your resume, you’ve come to the right place. We’ve split up this series into two parts. Learn about formatting, fonts and appropriate length a resume in part one.

 

Before we begin, there’s no right or wrong way to write a resume. Some employers prefer a certain format over another. We will help you with the fundamentals and you can decide how you want to lay it out.

 
Resume Format

The format sets up the feel of your resume and is sort of like a first impression of yourself to the employer. For example, if the format is messy and hard to navigate, the employer might think that you are unorganized. However, if all the information on your resume is neatly formatted, it shows responsibility and is overall visually appealing.

 
Margins:

When formatting your resume on the computer, make sure your margins aren’t too wide. People widen their margins so they can fit more information on the page. Just because all your information looks like it fits on one page on the computer, doesn’t mean it will when it’s printed. Sometimes the words might bleed off the page when employers print your resume. To make sure this doesn’t happen, save your resume as a PDF file or do a test print to see what it looks like.

 
Make sure your resume is NEAT!

This means no clutter and lots of white space so employers can easily navigate through it.

Resumes often get tossed in the trash because it looks messy and hard to read at first glance. Everything must be consistent. For example, if your employment dates are italicized, it should be italicized throughout the whole resume. If each previous job title is bold, make sure they’re bold the whole way through.

 

Length of resume:

Nowadays, employers receive so many applications that they don’t have time to look through everything on your resume. People have short attention spans and when they see that a resume is more than two pages long or it’s just way too cluttered with information, they won’t even give it a chance. If you’re just starting out with minimal experience, keep it to one page. After a few years, you can expand it to one and a half to two pages max. Resumes that are more than two pages long are usually the ones that are written for positions such as directors, senior managers, vice presidents or CEOs.

 

Fonts

The type of font you use ties with the neatness and visual appeal of your resume. or is too small, Don’t try to be too fancy

 

Types of font to use on your resume:

Stick to readable fonts like Times New Roman or Arial. If you use a font that is too hard to read such as cursive fonts, the employer will not bother and again, toss your resume into the trash.

 

Font size on your resume:

The safest thing to do is to keep the standard “12 size font”. Eleven or 11.5 size font is acceptable too. Just don’t make it too big or too small. You don’t want to give the hiring manager a hard time looking at it.

 

Part two of Resume Writing for Beginners will be posted tomorrow. Stay tuned!

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