Why Early Job Experiences Matter

Why Early Job Experiences Matter

 

You might think those early jobs you had like slinging burgers in a fast food location or going door to door with your lawn mower don’t have any effect on your long-term professional life. Maybe you should take a look at the things you gained from those early job experiences.

 

The Benefit of Experience

The only benefit from every job isn’t simply the potential is has to become a bullet point or paragraph on your resume. Sometimes it’s about the experiences you accumulated while you were there.

 

Obviously if you want to become a programmer, standing behind the grill won’t have taught you anything about coding, but it did teach you a few things.

 

What did you learn?

Working in fast food for example requires you to work quickly and efficiently and carefully. (You wouldn’t want to burn yourself!)

 

If you’re behind he counter, you’ll learn all about dealing with difficult customers, how to take ownership of your mistakes if you mess up. You also learn what it means to be a good co-worker.

 

If you did go door-to-door with your lawnmower you learned all kinds of things about scheduling, talking to people, taking control of your own destiny.

 

Every experience impacts the person you become

Sometimes it’s important to re-frame how you look at early jobs and recognize the benefits of the experiences you had there. Learning how to deal well with customers and co-workers, learning to be accountable to yourself and your job are experiences you can apply to everything you do for the rest of your career.

 

Every experience you have contributes to the person you become. Whether you’re conscientious or lazy. Whether you work well with others and are able to ask for help when needed. Whether you become the go-to person or there never-there person.

 

Pay attention to the shape your taking. Embrace what you learn in every situation.

Have You Thought About An Internship?

Have You Thought About An Internship?

 

Sometimes an internship leads to a job offer sometimes it doesn’t. Sometimes you get to do interesting, motivating work, sometimes you end up becoming the coffee guy. They can be hit and miss.

 

At the very least an internship will help you make connections with people in that field and give you a good idea whether or not this is something you actually want to pursue.

 

If you want an amazing internship experience, check out this post from The Muse.

What You Don’t Do Is As Important As What You Do

What You Don’t Do Is As Important As What You Do

 

Everyone knows the importance of To-Do lists for keeping themselves on track and ensuring that nothing falls through the cracks. Often lost in the shadow of the powerful To-Do List is the less recognized but also important To-Don’t List.

 

You may not have heard of the To-Don’t List so let us explain. It’s a list of things you don’t want to do everyday. Things that hold you back, that drain your energy and productivity. That waste your time.

 

Here’s a quick overview of why a To-Don’t List can help you Avoid Time-Wasting or Repetitive Tasks from Lifehacker

 

Not only will creating a To-Don’t List help you remember all the things that hold you back, it will also help you clarify the things you want to add to your daily To-Do List.

 

Same as a To-Do list, your To-Don’t list needs to be personalized to your lifestyle and habits. Unlike a To-Do list that will probably change daily, a To-Don’t list is normally updated much less frequently, because of instead of being a list of specific things you need to do everyday, it’s more like a general list of things you don’t want to do everyday. So it will likely only get revised when you realize there’s something else that needs to be added to it.

 

Once you’ve got the To-Don’t List that works for you, post it where you can see it everyday.

 

Here are a few examples of things on our To-Don’t List:

 

Don’t stop what you’re doing every time an email comes through

Emails are like buses. They come through all day long and there’s always another one coming. Some of them are important, some less important and some are out and out time wasters.

 

No matter which category a specific email falls into, when you stop what you’re doing to attend to it you’re breaking the flow of whatever it is you’re trying to accomplish. Your concentration gets broken, you start thinking about other things and it takes time to get yourself back in the right mindset to finish what you were working on – and then another email shows up. Better to let the emails line up at the bus terminal and finish what you’re working on before taking a ride.

 

Don’t always fall back on what’s worked before

Learning shortcuts for doing things is great. But sometimes doing things the way you’ve always done them doesn’t give you the opportunity to come up with new, better ways of doing things. Pay close enough attention to what you’re doing to recognize when it’s time to try a different approach.

 

Don’t put off till tomorrow

“How can you have any pudding if you don’t eat your meat?” Just because we don’t like doing something doesn’t make it any less important. Instead of putting off things we don’t want to do or are afraid to do, it’s better to simply deal with them as they come up. Today.

 

Don’t dwell on the past

The past is full of positives and negatives. Dwelling on the past steals focus away from the present. Learn from it and then move on.

 

Don’t let yourself get dragged down by negative people

Negative people can drain your energy, and send you into your own negative feedback loop. Stay vigilant with your attitude. Recognize when you’re being influenced by someone else’s negativity and push the re-set button.

 

Not sure how to go about creating your To-Don’t List? Here are some suggestions from Allen Gannett in TNW News. The To-Don’t List: Things you will NOT do

 

Now it’s your turn. What’s on your To-Don’t List? Where are you going to put it so you’ll see it everyday?

Can An Introvert Become Company CEO?

Can An Introvert Become Company CEO?

 

When we think of leaders, whether they be leaders in our peer group, leaders on a work detail, or leaders of a whole company we will often picture extroverted, Hello, How Are you, Great To Meet you! Let’s spend the next several hours getting to know each other! types.

 

While extroverts might be great at commanding attention while oozing confidence, that doesn’t necessarily make them the best people to actually lead and inspire others. Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates are both highly inspiring and great leaders, and both are famous introverts.

 

Great listeners

Generally introverts actually prefer to listen than to speak. That makes them great listeners. An introvert is more likely to thoroughly listen to what others and telling them and then give those people more room to develop their ideas. An introvert likes to work on his or her own, so they give others the opportunity to do the same. People who work for introverts feel heard and recognized.

 

Well thought out decisions

Where an extroverted CEO might be inclined to burst out of the gate running full steam ahead, an introvert will more likely have spent a lot more time with an idea in his or her head, regarding it from every perspective before moving forward. Their decisions are well thought out and well informed.

 

In the GeekWire article, Do Introverts Make Better CEOs 

 

They refer to a study made by researchers from Stanford and the University of Chicago that found “A correlation between CEOs with reserved personlities and contemporaneous and future return on assets and cash flow.”

 

Passion has nothing to do with extroversion or introversion

The thing all successful CEOs have in common is great passion for what they’re doing. Passion has nothing to do with whether you love to take command of a room or whether you prefer more intimate encounters. Passion comes from within and when you find something you’re passionate about that’s what’s going to take you to the top.

 

Check out the inspiring life lessons from these Three introverted CEOs

 

If you’re introverted and thought leadership was out of the question, think again. The CEO prize is as available to you as anyone else!

Stop Looking For A Job and Get One

Stop Looking For A Job and Get One

 

Been on the job search for a while? Having trouble transitioning from the searching end of a job quest to the receiving end of an offer? Here are a few tips that will help get you to that offer quicker.

 

Don’t box yourself into small boxes

Some people look at the long list of requirements for job openings and only apply where they have experience in everything.

 

There are plenty of instances where people who don’t have all the qualifications listed are the ones chosen by the hiring manager. Sometimes it comes down to other related experiences, or aptitude in certain areas, or personality type, or potential.

 

If you have the majority of the qualifications they’re looking for go ahead and apply. Wow them with all the reasons they should give you an interview in the cover letter and see what happens. Like Wayne Gretzky says, “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.”

 

Learn to boast

You might not feel comfortable tooting your own horn, but you can be pretty sure the person who steps into that interview after you, or the one who was sitting in your seat before you got there made a point of letting the interviewer know exactly how wonderful they were.

 

Sitting there bragging about what a wonderful human being you are will turn people off, but if you talk about they way you worked so wonderfully with others to achieve great results, it paints the picture of a wonderful human being.

 

Relax and be friendly

Yes you are in a job interview, yes it’s nerve wracking, but in the end you are one person talking to another person. Do your homework. Prepare as well as you can, then relax. Go in there with a big smile, and let that wonderful person you’re going to refer to later in the interview shine through.