Learn To Convey Your Strengths During the Interview

Learn To Convey Your Strengths During the Interview

There are all kinds of reasons that interviews don’t go well. Sometimes it’s as simple as you weren’t the best candidate for the position. However sometimes you were the best person for the job. You missed out because you were too nervous to present yourself in your best light. Or you weren’t able to convey just how perfect you were to the interviewer.

Let your power shine through

Let’s start with the nervous part. Most of us get nervous in competitive or stressful situations. But there are ways of tricking your body into actually feeling more confident. It’s all about creating a feeling of power and strength within yourself. You can do that with power poses. Striking a pose of power and holding it.

For example, before the interview, stand like Wonder Woman. Feet apart, hands on your hips, chin up. Take up space, breathe in and hold. You will start feeling more confident.

Or stand like a star athlete. Feet apart, arms above your head, fingers spread wide – like you just won the race of your life and hold.

Amy Cutty who has a Ted Talk online about how our body language shapes who we are talks about studies that have demonstrated the benefits of standing like a super hero. Testosterone increases significantly cortisol drops, people feel ready to take on more risks, their pain threshold his higher. They also think more abstractly and are more likely to do well in stressful situations – like job interviews.

 

Move from the general to the specific

While preparing for an interview people will often go online to research the sorts of questions they will be asked. Then they memorize the best way to answer them. The problem with that is they come off sounding rehearsed and mechanical in the interview.

 

The interviewer doesn’t want to hear the perfect answer to a question. They want to hear your answer to the question. That means read how you should answer the question then create an answer based on your experiences and qualifications.

 

Why are you perfect for the position?

You might not get asked this question specifically, but ultimately every question you are asked is working toward answering it. Think about your motivations, your strengths, your values, your personality. Bring those into every answer. Come up with examples from your life and your experiences. Make it personal. The more personal you make it the more confident you’ll sound.

 

You look confident, you sound confident. If you’re a perfect fit for the job, the interviewer will know it.

An Interview That’s Lacking

An Interview That's Lacking

Just about all of us have had some good interviews and some not so good ones. If you were to dissect what went wrong at the not so good ones you’d find they were lacking certain things. We’ve compiled a list of them here.

 

Lack of confidence

Not everyone is born brimming with confidence, but every single one of us can certainly convey confidence. Sit up straight, maintain eye contact, don’t fidget, smile and don’t speak a mile a minute. You will appear confident.

 

Lack of research

If you haven’t done adequate research on the company you are applying for, how can you expect to speak intelligently about the organization or the position? Before stepping into an interview ensure you’ve Googled the company. Check them out on social media. Have a few a few facts about them that you can weave into the discussion.

 

Lack of preparation

There are certain questions that come up in just about every interview. If you think you can just wing them you are mistaken. Take the time to acquaint yourself with common interview questions then come up with thoughtful, intelligent answers

 

Lack of listening

Sometimes people get so caught up in what they want to say and how they’re going to answer the questions they expect, they don’t actually hear what the interviewer is saying. Pay close attention to the person in front of you. Ensure you are answering the question they are asking. Get into their headspace and follow their lead in terms of tone and speech pattern. If they are slow speakers, then slow down your speech. If they seem like they’re interested in elaborate, descriptive answers then provide those. If they’re more straightforward and to the point then follow suit.

 

Lack of enthusiasm

You might by nature be on the quiet side, but it is imperative that you convey your enthusiasm for the job and the company you’re interviewing with. That enthusiasm will come through in your tone of voice and your words. And at the end of the interview when you specifically ask for the job. As obvious as your interest may seem, given that you are sitting there interviewing for the job, it’s important of actually ask for the job. Something along the lines of, “It was a great pleasure meeting you. Given our discussion, I believe I can be a great asset to the company. I look forward to hearing back from you.”

Choosing Enthusiasm – Monday Motivation – The Job Window

to-infinity-and-beyond

When you were a kid maybe you wanted to be an astronaut or a mega superstar singing sensation, or an inventor – whatever it was, you were probably really excited about the idea of this amazing career you were going to have. The fabulous things you were going to do with your life, the thrill of everything that lay ahead of you.

 

Maybe some of you are still on the inventor path, but most are probably working toward something a little more commonplace. No matter what your career choice or the path you’ve chosen to follow, how do you feel about this life you’ve created for yourself?

 

Are you excited to get up everyday? Do you bring enthusiasm to what you’re doing?

Even if you are not exactly working toward the career of your dreams it is still important to find something to be enthusiastic about every day.

 

Maybe you like everything about what you’re doing, maybe half and maybe only a little. Maybe your enthusiasm resides in things you do outside of work, with friends for example, or a cause you volunteer with. Whatever it is that you like, focus on that. Make it your reason for jumping out of bed. By focusing on what brings you happiness, the things you don’t like feel less negative and the things you like even more positive.

 

Your attitude about your life is what will determine the life you are going to lead. Your position, your pay are not the ultimate determiners of your happiness. Your attitude is.

 

By choosing enthusiasm, by focusing on the bright moments – and there will invariably be bright moments, every day has the potential to lead you to infinity and beyond.

Tip Tuesday: Remember to Smile in Job Interviews!

“I was asked once how we taught all 1700 employees who worked at one property to smile. We didn’t teach anyone anything. Instead, we hired people who were already smiling.” – Arte Nathan

There is a lot of advice floating around the internet about how to be professional & sell yourself to showcase your skills for a job interview. But if we’re being honest with ourselves, often the deciding factor between a job offer and no job offer is your attitude and your personality – it’s if the person interviewing youwants to work with you. Sometimes it can be something as small as a warm smile that will put you ahead of competition!  As much as people will throw around the term “sell” yourself, you need to keep in mind that you’re not a product. You’re a person. Someone who your potential employer will be spending eight hours a day with, five days a week for the foreseeable future. Like anybody, they would much prefer to spend that time with someone they like.

Don’t get us wrong, skills are great – your qualifications are what got you called into an interview in the first place, and they’re important. But you’re there because they know you’re qualified – now they want to figure out what kind of person you are, and how you would fit into the position. Remember, everyone they’re interviewing is qualified. There are twenty people with resumes just as good – or better – than yours in the running. So stand out – this is about you as an individual now, not your skills. Be friendly and authentic, and show them why you in particular deserve the job more than anybody else they’re interviewing.

What do you offer no one else does?

Do your best not to freeze up from the nerves of trying to remember all that advice you’ve heard about handshakes and eye contact and tiny details. Forget all that. Just be confidant, relaxed and natural. Eye contact, smiling, posture and all sorts of other positive body language cues will fall into place naturally if you’re genuinely comfortable and confidant.

So take a deep breath, relax, and remember that your interviewer is a person just like you, and you don’t need to feel intimidated. Treat them like a person – ask them briefly about themselves, maybe joke with them (if the situation is appropriate, you don’t want to appear as if you don’t care – just that you’re confidant, and comfortable enough to show your sense of humor.) Be friendly, smile, show that that you’re both qualified for the position and a generally good person to be around.

If you strike up a good connection with them, they’ll remember you. If you make them laugh, they’ll want to see more of you. When it comes time to consider who gets the position in the end, you can bet you’ll be near the top of that list.