Afraid To Ask?

Afraid To Ask?

 

How often have you needed help or advice but refrained from asking? What stops you? The fear of rejection? Embarrassment? The conviction that the best way to do something is to do it yourself?

 

If help is easily given, most people are more than willing to offer it. More than that they enjoy helping when and where they can because help is a cycle. I help you, you help me. We all grow and succeed by helping each other.

 

Amanda Palmer is a self proclaimed “Rock Star” who made it pretty big in the indie scene when she raised over a million dollars in under a month from her fanbase of about

20,000 people. She attributes her success to being an excellent asker.

 

 

Amanda Palmer’s Ted Talk, “The Art of Asking,” is about the value of asking for help, and how the person helping you is actually repaid in how good it feels to help another person. She also wrote a book about the same topic.

 

According to Amanda, asking and giving is a never ending cycle. Askers are the best givers because they know what it’s like the be on the other side. And if they can, people genuinely want to give. The problem is so many of us have a problem with asking.

 

We don’t like asking for help or for money because it makes us feel guilty or ashamed for needing the help. But it shouldn’t. Because the day will come when someone will ask you and it’s the best feeling in the world to be able to return the favor to someone else.

 

Career related asking

One of the best things you can do as far as your career is concerned is to learn to ask. Ask people for help if you’re confused, don’t just blindly hope for the best. If you’re looking to learn something new or want to try something different, ask someone who’s already successful in that field if they’ll mentor you. If you need someone to take your shift, ask them. If you need to borrow a little money from a friend, just ask.

 

As long as you don’t abuse the asking privilege more often than not you’ll find the answer is “yes”. No one will think less of you for asking. We all need help sometimes. And we’re all in the position to provide help sometimes.

 

Positive physical effects of asking

On a more scientific note, asking actually has awesome effects on the brain. If you want someone to like you more, all you have to do is ask them for a small favor. Even if

they don’t like you, they’ll likely do it to not be a jerk.

 

Once they do it, their brain assumes they must like you, otherwise they wouldn’t be doing you this favor. So, they, in turn, like you better.

 

Asking and helping create bonding relationships

Asking and helping bonds people together. We love to help each other. It’s in our nature. We evolved to want to make sure everyone is okay. It makes all of us feel safe and secure and good about ourselves and each other.

 

 

So, next time you need help, don’t just push through it yourself. Give yourself a little nudge and ask. The worst they can say is no.

Biting Into The Apple

August26th-e1409153042913

Success? By the time Steve Jobs was 30 he’d turned Apple, a company he’d started in his garage with his friend Steve Wozniak into a $2 billion enterprise with 4,000 employees.

 

Failure? The board of directors fired Steve Jobs from his own company.

 

How do you come back from that? If you’re Steve Jobs you start Pixar (now the most successful animation studio in the world) get invited back to Apple and completely revolutionize modern technology with the introduction of iPods, iPhones, iPads, iDon’tknowwhatelse.

 

How does a guy who quit college after six months keep ending up the razor’s blade of the cutting edge?

 

You can listen to Steve Jobs explain it himself here in How To Live Before You Die. http://www.ted.com/talks/steve_jobs_how_to_live_before_you_die

 

These are the main points:

 

Follow Curiosity and Intuition

 

After quitting school Steve didn’t immediately leave the college, he hung around and started taking courses he was interested in, rather than the ones he needed to fulfill his requirements. One of those was calligraphy. He took it because he loved it, not because it would lead him anywhere specific. He learned about typefaces, what made typography great. Ten years later he was figuring out what he wanted to include in his new computer, and suddenly those typography classes seemed very useful indeed. All of us have all those cool font options because of the calligraphy class Steve Jobs took because he found typefaces fascinating.

 

“You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something – your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.”

 

Figure out what you love to do

 

Initially getting fired as CEO of Apple must have seemed like the worst possible thing that could have happened, but in retrospect, Steve Jobs says it was the best thing that ever happened to him. It freed him to enter one of the most creative periods of his life.

 

He started Pixar and a new hardware company called neXT because he still loved the computer business. Apple bought neXT and now that technology is at the heart of Apple.

 

And Pixar? Over to you Buzz: “To infinity and beyond!”

 

Sometimes life will hit you on the head with a brick. Don’t lose faith. Find what you love to do. Do what you believe is great work. Keep looking. Don’t settle. You’ll know when you find it.

 

Live each day as if it’s your last one

 

Each day ask yourself, if today was the last day of your life, would you want to do what you’re doing? If the answer is no too many days in a row then something needs to change. Thinking about the last day of your life helps you distinguish what’s really important. Helps you stop thinking you’ve to something to lose. Your time is limited so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t let the noise of others drown out your inner voice. Your own intuition knows what you want to be – so listen to yourself!

Resume Writing for Beginners (Part 1): Resume Formats & Fonts

 Image

If you’re applying to your first job and you have no idea how to begin writing your resume, you’ve come to the right place. We’ve split up this series into two parts. Learn about formatting, fonts and appropriate length a resume in part one.

 

Before we begin, there’s no right or wrong way to write a resume. Some employers prefer a certain format over another. We will help you with the fundamentals and you can decide how you want to lay it out.

 
Resume Format

The format sets up the feel of your resume and is sort of like a first impression of yourself to the employer. For example, if the format is messy and hard to navigate, the employer might think that you are unorganized. However, if all the information on your resume is neatly formatted, it shows responsibility and is overall visually appealing.

 
Margins:

When formatting your resume on the computer, make sure your margins aren’t too wide. People widen their margins so they can fit more information on the page. Just because all your information looks like it fits on one page on the computer, doesn’t mean it will when it’s printed. Sometimes the words might bleed off the page when employers print your resume. To make sure this doesn’t happen, save your resume as a PDF file or do a test print to see what it looks like.

 
Make sure your resume is NEAT!

This means no clutter and lots of white space so employers can easily navigate through it.

Resumes often get tossed in the trash because it looks messy and hard to read at first glance. Everything must be consistent. For example, if your employment dates are italicized, it should be italicized throughout the whole resume. If each previous job title is bold, make sure they’re bold the whole way through.

 

Length of resume:

Nowadays, employers receive so many applications that they don’t have time to look through everything on your resume. People have short attention spans and when they see that a resume is more than two pages long or it’s just way too cluttered with information, they won’t even give it a chance. If you’re just starting out with minimal experience, keep it to one page. After a few years, you can expand it to one and a half to two pages max. Resumes that are more than two pages long are usually the ones that are written for positions such as directors, senior managers, vice presidents or CEOs.

 

Fonts

The type of font you use ties with the neatness and visual appeal of your resume. or is too small, Don’t try to be too fancy

 

Types of font to use on your resume:

Stick to readable fonts like Times New Roman or Arial. If you use a font that is too hard to read such as cursive fonts, the employer will not bother and again, toss your resume into the trash.

 

Font size on your resume:

The safest thing to do is to keep the standard “12 size font”. Eleven or 11.5 size font is acceptable too. Just don’t make it too big or too small. You don’t want to give the hiring manager a hard time looking at it.

 

Part two of Resume Writing for Beginners will be posted tomorrow. Stay tuned!