Avoid Saying The Wrong Things During A Job Interview

Avoid Saying The Wrong Things During A Job Interview

Everyone knows there are things you can say during a job interview that will get you all kinds of brownie points.  For example, a demonstrated knowledge of the company you’re applying with that includes noteworthy facts you gleaned during your research. A well thought out plan for how you plan to evolve with the company that weaves your experiences in with the trajectory the company is already on.

 

Then there are things you can say that will essentially end the interview well before that final handshake.

 

Undemonstrated motivation

When asked about your positive qualities you definitely want to convey how motivated you are. However how you express that motivation can either make the interviewer sit up in interest or send them off into a daydream about lunch. If you say “I’m highly motivated,” and leave it at that, you’re essentially not saying anything of note to the interviewer. A truly motivated person talks about achievements. They talk about skills. They convey exactly how they are going to change the world around them to the best of their abilities.

 

Empty words

If an interviewer asks you about your weaknesses and you say you are a perfectionist what are they supposed to take away from that? No matter what the question, dig deep and find an answer that shines a light on your potential. Approach it from the standpoint of measurable improvement. What you did in a given situation, what you learned from it, how you improved, how you would approach a similar situation now.

 

Lack of interest

You know the interviewer is going to ask if you have any questions. Maybe the interview ends and you are totally satisfied with everything you heard. You feel great about what you said and you’re pretty sure you’re a shoe in for the job. So you answer, “No, I don’t have any questions,” and all your good work slams into a bad answer.

 

Having no questions indicates a lack of interest in the job and the interviewer – whether that’s what you actually meant or not. Always have questions ready to ask. Raise the expectations and interest as you close off your interview. Don’t bring them to a grinding halt!

 

Discussing vacations at the wrong time

Obviously, benefits like vacation time are important considerations for any job, however there is a time for that discussion and it’s not during your initial interview. If you bring it up too soon you’re telling the interviewer that you’re more interested in what the job can do for them than what you can do for the job. If there’s a second interview that’s the time to discuss vacation time, otherwise save it for negotiations.

Never Had A Job Interview?

Never Had A Job Interview?

If you’re about to head into your first interview, it can be pretty daunting. Preparing for an interview can be difficult, especially for beginners. Here’s what you can expect from a job interview, along with you some helpful ideas on the best way to prepare for it.

 

What to Expect

Let’s get the obvious stuff out of the way. You will most likely meet with one person, at their place of work to talk about getting a job. It’ll probably be you and the employer sitting down across from one another at their desk, or at a boardroom table.

Your interviewer may ask to see your resume. Depending on their hiring process, it’s never a guarantee they’ve seen it before. So always bring a copy of your resume with you. This is something beginners often forget. Make sure you bring it in something that prevents it from getting bent. If your interviewer asks to see your resume and you pull out a crumpled piece of paper, that’s all they’ll need to know about how much you want this position.

What Questions to Expect

Every interviewer is different and every interview will vary as far as the questions go. However, when you’re preparing for an interview there are a few common ones you can expect. Your interviewer will probably ask you to tell them a little bit about yourself. This is so they can get a sense of who you are. Give a brief description of where you went to high school and college, talk about your interests and how they led you to this position.

You’ll also be asked about a specific time in your past where you demonstrated a key ability. Most often, the ability they will ask about comes right from the job posting. Make sure to think of specific examples from work or school where you overcame an obstacle, had to deal with a difficult team member or found success. The more you can relate these to the job your interviewing for, the better.

Another very common question is where you see yourself in five years, or what your goals for the job are. When you are ready with an answer to this question it shows that you’ve thought about your future with the company.

How to Prepare for the Interview

Now that you know what to expect and what questions you might get, what else can you do to make sure you’re ready? The number one thing you can do is learn about the company! A demonstrated knowledge about the company shows you’re interested in not just the job, but this specific company as well. It can be as easy as checking out their website and following them on Facebook and Twitter.

When preparing for an interview you have to give yourself time. It may seem inconsequential compared with everything else you have to prepare, but have your outfit chosen and ready. Nothing is going to make you feel more nervous than running late. Have your resume printed and your clothes picked the night before. Make sure to give yourself lots of time to arrive.

Finally, make sure you have some questions for your interviewer. At the end of most interviews, you will be asked if you have any questions. If you don’t have one you give the impression that you uninterested. Having one or two questions will help you learn more about the position and prove that you’re interested in the job. A couple ideas for questions are “what does a typical day look like in this job” or “Why do you enjoy working for this company?

Prepared for the Interview

You’re all ready to go! Your resume and clothes ready. You’ve looked into the company your interviewing with and know all about them. You  have answers to the questions they’re likely to ask, and you’ve even thought of some of your own. All that’s left is to ace this interview and get the job! Good Luck.

Preparing for Your First Job Interview

Preparing for Your First Job Interview - The Job Window

If you’re about to head into your first interview, it can be pretty daunting. Preparing for an interview can be difficult, especially for beginners. Today we’ve got a heads up on what you can expect from a job interview, and some helpful ideas on the best way to prepare for it.

 

What to Expect

Let’s get the obvious stuff out of the way. You’re most likely going to be meeting with one person, at their place of work to talk about getting a job. It’ll probably be you and the employer sitting down across from one another at their desk, or at a boardroom table.

On to the less obvious stuff. Your interviewer may ask to see your resume. Depending on how they do their hiring process, it’s never a guarantee they’ve seen it before. So always bring a copy of your resume with you. This is something beginners often forget. Bring your resume in something that prevents it from getting bent as well. If your interviewer asks to see your resume and you pull out a crumpled piece of paper, that’s all they’ll need to know about how much you want this position.

 

What Questions to Expect

Every interviewer is different and every interview will vary as far as the questions go, but when you’re preparing for an interview there are a few common ones you can expect. Your interviewer will probably ask you to tell them a little bit about yourself. This is so they can get a sense of who you are. Give a brief description of where you went to high school and college, talk about your interests and how they led you to this position.

You’ll also be asked about a specific time in your past where you demonstrated a key ability. Most often, the ability they will ask about comes right from the job posting. Make sure to think of specific examples from work or school where you overcame an obstacle, had to deal with a difficult team member or found success. They more you can relate these to the job your interviewing for, the better.

 

Another very common question that gets asked in interviews is where you see yourself in five years, or what your goals for the job are. Being ready with an answer to this question shows that you’ve thought about your future with the company.

 

How to Prepare for the Interview

Now that you know what to expect and what questions you might get, what else can you do to make sure you’re ready? Undergrad Success points out the number one thing you can do is learn about the company!

 

Demonstrating knowledge about the company shows you’re interested in not just the job, but this specific company as well. It can be as easy as checking out their website and following them on Facebook and Twitter.

Set Yourself Up For A Great Interview

Set Yourself Up For A Great Interview

 

On paper you might be the best candidate for the job you’re about to interview for but if you’re too nervous to get that fact across in person the interviewer won’t know it. It’s okay to be nervous during an interview. Everyone is. They key to getting past that nervousness so your best most competent self can shine through is setting the mental stage for it before hand.

 

Inspire yourself musically

Some songs simply make you feel great. They can have associations with previous happy times in your life, times when everything was going great. Create a playlist of songs that inspire you and make you feel like you can do anything and play that in the morning of your interview. If that music makes you want to dance, then go right ahead and take to that dance floor while you’re getting ready!

 

Lighten the mood

We’ve all heard laughter is the best medicine. You may not think of laughter as a remedy for nerves, but it certainly can be. Find some funny videos before you go into your interview and break up your pre-interview tension with a few laughs.

 

Do the interview in your head

Before heading onto stage, performers do a dress rehearsal in their head. Athletes practice their game in their head as much as they do on the field.

 

Ace the interview first in your head then ace it again in person. Don’t just do this in the car or on the bus on the way to the interview. The day before or the morning of, find a quiet comfortable place to sit and run through your brilliant, smiling answers with the attentive, impressed interviewer. Do it until you feel great about the interview!

 

Listen to the voices in your head

Pay very close attention to your silent words. Are you telling yourself you’re going to do a great job or are you telling yourself you’re not qualified? You may not think the words in your head have any impact on what happens outside of it, but they do.

 

Every time you catch yourself thinking a negative thought about yourself or your chances for success, immediately counter that with positive talk. “Jane,” tell yourself, “You are eminently qualified for this job and you are going to have an outstanding interview!”

 

Worst-case scenario

Even if you do the interview and you don’t get the job, well what next? You try again with another job and another interview.

 

No job is the be all and end all of your career. Each one is a stepping stone to a new place in your life and career. Put the interview into perspective in the big picture. Remind yourself that although it would be great to get this job, even if you don’t get it, it’s still okay. You’ll have had an interview experience that will help you during the next one.

 

Alleviate the pressure of perfection. You will do your best and if you’re successful that’s great. If you’re not that’s fine too. No worries.

Why Can’t I Get My Dream Job? – A Frank Answer

So you’ve been looking for a job for a while and nothing is working. You’ve created a great resume, you interview excellently, but for some reason nobody is calling you back. You shake your fist at the economy, blame the poor job market, and bitterly think about how good you could be if they just gave you a chance. You need experience to get a job, and a job to get experience, this whole system is broken and designed specifically to ruin you – you who could be so amazing if only the world weren’t so pitted against you – how is anyone expected to succeed like this?

Stop. Stop right there.

Yes, the system is broken – that’s just how it goes. But that is not an excuse to sit at home all day complaining about it. Successful people happen every day, all the time, and they deal with the same system you do. Generally speaking, they aren’t special. They’re not smarter than you, or better looking than you or born into better circumstances. The only thing separating you from the hundreds of people finding success right at this moment is the effort you put into what you do.

Give it All You Got:
Yes, the job market is terrible. Successful people skirt that and make their own opportunities. Want to own a bakery? Start baking every single day. Learn to make the most delicious goddamn cupcakes on the face of this good green earth and give samples to your friends. Start selling them to their friends. Get a crap job on the side and save like a maniac with the goal of a bakery in mind. Be so good no one can ignore you. Be so good people line up outside just for a bite of one of your delicious pastries. Put hours and hours into perfecting what you do. If you want to be successful, you can’t half ass anything. Because there are 20 people who want the same thing as you do and they’re willing to put in the work.

Prepare Your Goals in Advance:
Make a list every morning of three things you want to do that will inch you closer to your goal. Find people who are doing what you want to do, ask to buy them lunch, and pick their brain about every detail of their success. Find out what kind of person excels in the industry and become that person. Zero in on this one thing and make your life about it. Live and breathe it, research it to death, do as much as you can on your own so when you’re finally being considered for that job, you’ll have a lot to show them.

Look Professional:
Pay attention to your appearance – in a perfect world it wouldn’t matter, but we don’t live in that world. People’s first impression of who you comes from how you look, so look like someone they’d want to hire. Maybe they’d love you if they got to know you, but that’s not good enough. Make them love you from the moment they see you until the moment you leave. Be charming and friendly and professional and show them you have initiative and the skills they want.

If all that sounds like too much effort then you have no right to complain about not having the job you want. If you press full speed ahead into your goals, they’ll get done. But if you’d like to lazily wander after them, then you will only experience mediocrity throughout your career path.