Make An Impact By Planning Your Conversations

Make An Impact By Planning Your Conversations

All of us have conversations all day long, but when we have an important piece of information to convey rather than just diving in like with any other conversation, it’s better to plan ahead.

 

The importance of the beginning

Whether speaking to a group or an individual, how you start is of utmost importance because it’s the first impression of that conversation. Those first few seconds are going to set the tone of what follows. They’re going to be a huge determinant of whether the person or persons you’re speaking to are going to pay attention and care about what you’re about to say or whether they’re going to mentally check out.

 

Before you start speaking you should know where you want to start and where you want to end. By the time you’re into the crux of what you want to say, you want your listeners leaning forward mentally, and emotionally prepared to take it in.

 

There are several ways for you to grab the audience or person you’re speaking to.

 

Well thought out compliments

A sincere, well thought out compliment shows them that you’ve been paying attention to them and they will reciprocate by paying attention back to you.

 

Attention grabbing facts

Get the most important or riveting fact about what you’re going to say out right away. Capture their attention. We broke sales records last month and I know exactly how we can do it again this month.

 

If there’s recently been any news related to what you’re about to say, have a tangible, physical copy of it there with you, so you can show it to the person, let them hold it in their hands or pass it amongst themselves as tangible proof of what you’re saying.

 

A smiling face

Pay attention to what your face is doing. Some people naturally smile all the time, others don’t. It doesn’t mean the smiling person is always happy and the more neutral faced person only rarely feels enthusiastic about anything, it’s simply where their face naturally falls. If you want to engage the person or people you’re speaking to, make a conscious effort to smile. Welcome them into your space.

 

You already know what you want to say. Instead of focusing on yourself, focus on the person or people in front of you. Look confident, build up positive expectations, take charge while staying authentic and humble.

 

 

Find common ground

Find commonalities between you and the ones you’re speaking to. Personal or professional, it doesn’t matter. These commonalities are a bridge to close the distance between you and them, while also serving as a conduit into the main topic of discussion you’re about to go into.

Make All Your Wishes Come True. Plan For It

Make All Your Wishes Come True. Plan For It

Imagine you’re walking along the beach and a twinkle of something washing in on the waves catches your eye. You reach down and grab it up before the current drags it back out to sea. It’s a conch shell, but like none you’ve ever seen before.

You use the tail of your shirt to rub the sand and salt off the gleaming purple exterior and a wisp of smoke billows out from the end.  Swirling in the wind, the wisp gains speed and substance and whirls into a genie! An – I will make all your wishes come true type genie.

So, what are the chances you are going to find a magic conch on your next walk on the beach? About the same as your chances of wishing your dreams into reality.

Planning around a wish

We all have all kinds of wishes and we spend lots of time thinking about them and planning around them and visualizing them. When my wish comes true and I have achieved (fill in the blank) I will do/have/be (fill in the blank). Planning around a wish takes time and energy and is about as effective as looking for magic conchs on the shore.

Plan for a wish

Planning for a wish is a different thing altogether. Planning for something means creating a roadmap to get you where you need to go. Looking at the big picture starting with where you are now and ending at where you want to be. Writing out achievable goals with definite start/end dates along the way.

You are your own magic genie. Although you might not be able to make all your wishes come true, you can certainly make a push for them. You will achieve goals along the way and each one will be a wish come true in its own small way.

How To Take Action Back From Inaction

How To Take Action Back From Inaction

Sometimes things are going gangbusters. You and your goals are a hive of activity, you are learning, expanding, planning for the future. And then sometimes that planning trips a pause button. Then you end up stuck in a room where you can’t seem to find a way out.

 

Planning takes over more and more of your mind space. and then without realizing it, the doing has taken a back seat to planning. Or worse your plans have gotten too big for their britches and instead of being something you’re looking forward to, this thing you’re planning feels overwhelming. Then you get stuck.

 

Small movements lead to big movements

Not everyone has big goals, but just about everyone has faced big plans that never went much further than great intentions. For instance, let’s say you plan on getting in shape. You don’t want to just get in shape you want to become strong. You want to be able to dead lift 300 pounds as easily as if you were lifting 30. Your big plans to lift 300 might just get in the way of lifting the weight that you already know is easy.

 

You can spend all kinds of time delaying getting started. Researching gyms, shopping for exercise clothes, pondering the benefits of vanilla protein powder vs. chocolate protein powder but eventually if you’re ever going to lift those 300 pounds, you’re going to have to start by lifting something. It doesn’t matter how much. The key is getting started. Once you do, you can start adding weights on a regular basis and incrementally you will get stronger and stronger.

 

Once you start moving and doing it’s much easier to keep on doing and moving

Same thing goes for accomplishing your goals. You might have big plans, but somehow you can’t get your eyes off the view of the top, down to the bottom where you need to be to build your way up there.

 

 

In the article, Two Ways To Overcome Inertia from Forbes. Sonia Kapadia mentions two ways to break the wall between planning and doing. One is to force things to happen by creating deadlines and accountability for yourself. That might take the form of something as simple as writing your daily intentions down on your calendar where you have to face them every day.

 

The second way is to take a full break from everything, both planning and doing. Clear your mental space then come in, with the intention of pulling your goals out of the planning stage into doing.

 

No matter which way you prefer, your goal is to stop thinking about what you want to do and put your shoes on and start doing it.  You can’t start at the top where you want to be. You start at the bottom and build your way to the top. Make mistakes. Learn. Ask for help. Think of yourself as a small snowball at the top of a mountain. You just need to push yourself off. Soon you’ll start accumulating speed and weight, excited to see how big you’ll finally get by the time you reach the town below.

 

Moving From Planning to Doing

Moving From Planning to Doing

Sometimes things are going gangbusters. You and your goals are a hive of activity, you are learning, expanding, planning for the future. And then sometimes that planning trips a pause button and you end up stuck in a room where you can’t seem to find a way out.

 

Maybe you’re planning on ways to get a new idea you have off the ground, or you’re working on getting a promotion, or figuring out how to get this book you’ve written published. The planning takes over more and more of your mindspace. and then without realizing it, the doing has taken a back seat to planning. Or worse your plans have gotten too big for their britches. Instead of being something you’re looking forward to, this thing you’re planning feels overwhelming. Then you get stuck.

 

Small movements lead to big movements

Not everyone is trying to get a new idea off the ground, but just about everyone has faced big plans that never went much further than great intentions. For instance, lets say you plan on getting in shape. You don’t want to just get in shape you want to become strong. You want to be able to dead lift 300 pounds as easily as if you were lifting 30. Your big plans to lift 300 might just get in the way of lifting the weight that you already know is easy.

You can spend all kinds of time delaying getting started. Researching gyms, shopping for exercise clothes, pondering the benefits of vanilla protein powder vs. chocolate  protein powder. However, eventually if you’re ever going to lift those 300 pounds, you’re going to have to start by lifting something. It doesn’t matter how much. The key is getting started. Once you do, you can start adding weights on a regular basis and incrementally you will get stronger and stronger.

 

Once you start moving and doing it’s much easier to keep on doing and moving

Same thing goes for following through on your goals. You might have big plans, but somehow you can’t get your eyes off the view of the top, down to the bottom where you need to be to build your way up there.

 

 

In the article, Two Ways To Overcome Inertia from Forbes, Sonia Kapadia mentions two ways to break the wall between planning and doing. One is to force things to happen by creating deadlines and accountability for yourself. That might take the form of something as simple as writing your daily intentions down on your calendar where you have to face them every day.

 

The second way is to take a full break from everything, both planning and doing. Clear your mental space then come in, with the intention of pulling your goals out of the planning stage into doing.

 

No matter which way you prefer, your goal is to stop thinking about what you want to do and put your shoes on and start doing it.  You can’t start at the top where you want to be. You start at the bottom and build your way to the top. Make mistakes. Learn. Ask for help. Think of yourself as a small snowball at the top of a mountain. You just need to push yourself off. Soon you’ll start accumulating speed and weight, excited to see how big you’ll finally get by the time you reach the town below.

Plan To Make Every Week A Productive Week

Plan To Make Every Week A Week Of Accoplishments

 

You look out at the week ahead, an expanse of unfilled time, and imagine all the things you are going to accomplish. Then the week ends and you look back on a pile of things that for one reason or another didn’t get to the finish line. Day after day, week after week you just can’t seem to match your intentions with your accomplishments.

 

The problem is, without taking concrete steps to implement them, plans in your head are too vague to consistently see the light of day. In order to be successful a plan in your head needs to be concretized, somewhere you can actually see it written down every day. That starts with a bit of pre-planning.

 

Plan monthly accomplishments

In the process of working towards weekly goals, it helps to step back and look at the bigger picture. What are your goals for the entire month ahead? Write them down. Now put them in a priority list. Some people like to use planners, some have a white board by their desk, some have stickies on their computer (virtual or actual). The point is they need to stare back at you every day to keep you accountable.

 

Break down each goal

Now that you have your prioritized list of what you are going to accomplish, create an action plan for each one. This is where you get specific. By taking the time to really think this through you are already setting your mind into accomplishment mode.

 

Create a weekly schedule  

Take your action plan for each goal and break it down into a weekly do-to list for the month. This is where plans meet action. It’s overwhelming to think about a large overall goal. It’s much easier when you look at it in digestible weekly bites.

 

Make a daily plan

Productivity is all about specificity. At the beginning of the week set daily timelines for each thing on that week’s plan. That makes it simple. It’s 10:00 time to do X.

 

Adjust your plan accordingly

At the end of the week review your performance. If there’s anything that you didn’t manage to finish reschedule it into the to-do list for the following week. Planning out the week in advance and reviewing your progress is what will keep you on task and productive. In this way you’ll be able to make productivity a habit!

Energizing Your Days

energizing your days

It would be great if all us could work at peak performance all the way through the day, but invariably we slump and feel tired. Maybe your slump is before lunch, or after lunch, maybe it hits you mid-afternoon. Instead of giving in to the fact that there are times during the day when we’re only able to just get by, there are ways to help compensate so you’re working with more equal amounts of energy throughout the day. Here are a few tips to help you energize your days.

 

Mirror your tasks with your energy levels

Most people are at their best mid-morning and mid afternoon so it’s a good idea to organize your to-do list around your energy levels. Save the most complicated, mentally draining tasks for the times when you’re best equipped to handle them. That way, instead of letting them drag you down and making you even more tired you’ll breeze through them.

 

Energizing through movement

You don’t have to start doing jumping jacks at your desk, (although that would be cool) but you should get up. Go for a walk around the office. Get outside and walk around the building, find some excuse to walk up and down the stairs for a few minutes. It doesn’t really matter what you do, just make a point of doing something, several times a day. Any type of physical movement will boost your energy and alertness.

 

Close your eyes

Don’t close them under your desk in the middle of a nap, close them as part of a quick meditation. Here are a few examples of mindfulness meditation exercises, a great way to restore your energy levels during the day.

 

Skip the extra hit of caffeine

Instead of actually providing more energy, what coffee does is mask the effects of low energy levels, so it’s best to avoid getting into the habit of using it as a go-to pick-me-up.

 

Don’t forget the importance of a good night’s sleep

You might think you’re functioning just fine on only a few hours sleep but studies have shown that being sleep deprived has the same impact on your brain as a couple of glasses of wine. Check out these 10 Things to Hate about Sleep Loss from WebMD. The best way to power through the day is to get more rest through the night!