Start – It Doesn’t Matter Where

Start - It Doesn't Matter Where

One of the biggest stumbling blocks to getting anything done is thinking about it. Actually, thinking about doing a thing isn’t the problem.  Problems arise when we start overthinking. When we over-think a thing, it’s like shining a huge magnifying glass on it. The project or event or conversation becomes disproportionately large. Imperfections you wouldn’t otherwise notice take on monumental significance.

Magnifying glass of over-thought

For example, let’s say you want to ask your boss for a raise. You have been with the company for over a year and you believe you’re doing a good job, but you’ve never asked anyone for a raise before. You actually feel lucky to even have a job. The more you think about it, the more you think maybe it’s best to leave well enough alone. You’re managing after all. Your boss isn’t exactly the most approachable person. If she wanted to give you a raise, she would have just given you the raise you think. Plus, you did come in late twice in the last month. It would be better to delay this whole raise question for another month when you feel readier.

 

In fact, you won’t feel readier in another month. If anything, you’ll feel even less prepared to get in there and ask for that raise because you’ve over-thought yourself into thinking you don’t really want or need that raise at all.

 

Action breaks stagnation

The best way to get past the wall of thought is to DO something. There are a few things you should do before asking for a raise. One of them is to research dos and don’ts of asking for a raise. Prepare, by determining your worth and writing out your future goals.

 

Whether you want to ask for a raise, or write the next New York Times best seller, or become a self-made person like Richard Branson, you have to get out of your head and into your life.

 

Start somewhere

If you’re that writer but you don’t have a story for the character that’s been living in your head, start by writing about the character. Join a writing group. Read books from your favourite authors. Create a dedicated time for writing every day and write something – anything. Make a start on the project. Action will lead to more action and soon your project will gain a momentum of its own.

Do You Believe It’s Time For A Raise?

Do You Believe It's Time For A Raise?

Although automatic pay raises are the standard in some place, in most it’s not that straightforward. If you believe it’s time for a raise then it’s up to you to get the ball rolling.

 

Do some research

See if you can find some documentation regarding the company’s compensation policies. Evaluate your performance, and contributions you’ve made.

 

Have you helped increase profits in any way? Have you helped other employees in any capacity? What strengths do you bring to the position?

 

Have all those facts prepared before you start talking money.

 

Keep a running tally

It can be hard to remember all your great contributions over an extended period of time. That’s why it is a great idea to keep a running tally of your accomplishments. Goals you’ve met. Projects where you’ve made positive contributions. Revenue you’ve brought in, savings that can be attributed to you.

 

Don’t fade into the background

Make sure you get noticed. Speak up when opinions are asked for (even when they’re not) Ask questions, offer insights. Take opportunities when they are presented.

 

Stay positive

Don’t bring any negatives into the conversation. Even if you believe you work harder than others, stay longer, put up with more, only discuss the positives.

 

Be aware of timing

If you know the company is going through a difficult time financially then it’s not the right time to approach anyone for a raise. However if things are going well don’t wait for them to notice your good work. Make sure they are aware of it.

 

Don’t just talk about what a great job you’ve done, bring in concrete proof and wow them! The question won’t be will they give you a raise or not, it will be how much?

The Raise Conversation

The Raise Conversation

No one likes to talk about money. Conversations about money have a tendency to get awkward and can often lead to arguments. This is true in our daily life and our work life. But at some point, money needs to be talked about. At some point, you’re going to want to make more cash. Asking for a raise can be one of the more nerve wracking things you have to do at work. To give you the confidence you need to ask for a bump in pay, we’ve put together some helpful advice on when and how to ask for a raise.

When to Ask for a raise

One of the most common questions about asking for a raise is when to do it. If you’re new to a job, how long should you wait before bringing it up?

In an article about asking for a raise, Forbes suggests “Maybe this seems old-fashioned, given how often people change careers—but in my experience, I’ve found that the one-year mark still seems to be the standard by which most managers distinguish the “probational” employees from the veterans.”

This isn’t a hard and fast rule, but something to be mindful of. Think you deserve a pay increase before that one year mark has passed? You better have some good reasons why.

The other thing to keep in mind when it comes to when you should ask for a raise is how the company, and your position with company, are doing. Is the company growing? Did it just land a huge client or post great earnings? This would be an ideal time to ask for a pay increase. Did a number of other employees just get let go? Is the company asking you to bring your own coffee to work to save on costs? Maybe wait a little while before you ask about getting more money.

How to Ask for a Raise

Knowing how to ask for a raise is as important as knowing when to ask for one. To start off with, have a sit down with your boss. Asking for a raise isn’t a conversation to have near the water-cooler.

Depending on the situation, you might be tempted to start with a complaint about how you haven’t had a raise recently or that you’re making less than others in comparable positions. Opening with a complaint, or complaining in general is going to do one thing; kill your manager’s interest in the conversation.

Focus on the work you’ve done for the company, the growth you’ve helped achieve and the ways in which your role with the company has developed. A raise, like any business, is all about the numbers. If you can show that you’ve helped those numbers grow you have a much better chance at getting the raise.

An Offer Too Good to Refuse

The best thing you can do to ensure you get the outcome you want is research. Research what others in your position are making. Getraised.com, Salary.com and Glassdoor.com are all great places to look. Knowing what others are making gives you an idea of how much you can ask for.

Also be sure to make an “I’m Awesome” folder. Keep track of your accolades and present them in your meeting. As Matt Wilson writes in The Globe and Mail “If you can go to your boss and say that you are responsible for huge numbers and possess knowledge that is irreplaceable to the operations of the business then your boss will be forced to pay you to keep you happy!”

Getting the Raise
Asking for a raise starts long before you sit down to talk about it with your boss. It starts with research into other positions like yours. It continues as you build up a case for yourself, stockpiling your accomplishments and abilities. Getting the outcome you want is helped by asking at the right time. Getting a raise is all but guaranteed when you are able to make an offer too good to refuse.

Raise Time?

Raise Time?

 

No one likes to talk about money. Conversations about money have a tendency to get awkward and can often lead to arguments. This is true in our daily life and our work life. But at some point, money needs to be talked about. At some point, you’re going to want to make more cash. Asking for a raise can be one of the more nerve wracking things you have to do at work. To give you the confidence you need to ask for a bump in pay, we’ve put together some helpful advice on when and how to ask for a raise.

 

When to Ask for a raise

One of the most common questions about asking for a raise is when to do it. If you’re new to a job, how long should you wait before bringing it up?

 

The most common benchmark is the one year mark. By then you’re firmly established in your position and your manager can assess how far you’ve come and how your contributions have affected the company.

 

This isn’t a hard and fast rule, but something to be mindful of. Think you deserve a pay increase before that one year mark has passed? You better have some good reasons why.

The other thing to keep in mind when it comes to when you should ask for a raise is how the company, and your position with company, are doing.

 

Is the company growing? Did it just land a huge client or post great earnings? This would be an ideal time to ask for a pay increase. Did a number of other employees just get let go? Is the company asking you to bring your own coffee to work to save on costs? Maybe wait a little while before you ask about getting more money.

 

How to Ask for a Raise

Knowing how to ask for a raise is as important as knowing when to ask for one. To start off with, have a sit down with your boss. Asking for a raise isn’t a conversation to have near the water-cooler.

 

Depending on the situation, you might be tempted to start with a complaint about how you haven’t had a raise recently or that you’re making less than others in comparable positions. Opening with a complaint, or complaining in general is going to do one thing; kill your manager’s interest in the conversation.

 

Focus on the work you’ve done for the company, the growth you’ve helped achieve and the ways in which your role with the company has developed. A raise, like any business, is all about the numbers. If you can show that you’ve helped those numbers grow you have a much better chance at getting the raise.

 

An Offer Too Good to Refuse

The best thing you can do to ensure you get the outcome you want is research. Research what others in your position are making. Getraised.com, Salary.com and Glassdoor.com are all great places to look. Knowing what others are making gives you an idea of how much you can ask for.

 

Also be sure to make an “I’m Awesome” folder. Keep track of your accolades and present them in your meeting. As Matt Wilson writes in The Globe and Mail “If you can go to your boss and say that you are responsible for huge numbers and possess knowledge that is irreplaceable to the operations of the business then your boss will be forced to pay you to keep you happy!”

 

Getting the Raise
Asking for a raise starts long before you sit down to talk about it with your boss. It starts with research into other positions like yours. It continues as you build up a case for yourself stockpiling your accomplishments and abilities. Getting the outcome you want is helped by asking at the right time. Getting a raise is all but guaranteed when you are able to make an offer too good to refuse.