Grab The Resume Reader’s Attention

Grab Resume Reader’s Attention

 

Whether your resume is being read by the HR manager, the head of a company, a hiring manager or a recruiter, you can bet it’s sitting in a big pile of other resumes. When your resume hits the top of the pile you have about six seconds to grab that person’s attention.

 

Make your intentions immediately obvious

If you are applying to a posted job, use the job description to highlight the skills and qualifications the employer is looking for. Make it part of the mission statement. Use bold type. Put the most pertinent information front and center.

 

Highlight accomplishments

When listing the what I did’s on your resume don’t leave it at just a list of bullet points. Expand on those bullets. Explain how what you did impacted the company, improved efficiency (in quantifiable terms. I did X and productivity increased by Y), made for a more enjoyable, productive workplace.

 

Demonstrate your leadership attributes

Even if you were not in a leadership role, you talk about the leadership role you took with yourself. The times when your imitative impacted the job or the company or others. Never be afraid to shine a positive light on your accomplishments.

 

Show a career progression

Think of your resume as a timeline for your career. Make it easy to see how you grew from position to position with an increase in responsibility. Make it easy for the hiring manager to see your professional development through each position.

 

Don’t forget your keywords

Each industry has certain keywords that are an integral part of the community. Use those keywords in your resume to ensure the hiring manager knows you are in integral part of that community.

Job Fact: Job Search = Full-time Job

“Searching for a job is like a full-time job.”

We’re sure you’ve heard this phrase at some point, especially if you’re on the job hunt. The fact of the matter is, that it is true. Studies show that in order to be employed, one must treat their job search as a full-time job.

Now you might ask: “How do you expect me to sit in front of the computer for eight hours from Monday to Friday and look for jobs?” Here’s a wake up call. Treating your job as a full-time job does not mean sitting at your desk firing away resumes everyday – that’s just a portion of it. Another chunk of your day should be spent either volunteering/interning, attending industry seminars/events, mingling with professionals and making connections.

Last year, 1054 companies were surveyed and 58% said that all of their hiring was internal. This was either through employee referrals or company portals. Either way, making strong relationships with the right people (especially people who are in a position of power) will make a difference in your career path.

Source: U.S. News

Wall Street Job Report – How to Get Your Resume Past Computer Screening

Credit: The Wall Street Job Report

Hundreds and thousands of resumes pour in for recruiters and hiring managers to look over everyday. To make their lives easier, computerized systems help them select potential candidates by scanning keywords and other information. This often is a disadvantage to job seekers because resume #312 can be easily lost in the pile. To get around this, the Wall Street Job Report has some tips on How to Get Your Resume Past Computer Screening Tactics.

 


 

Resume Writing for Beginners (Pt 3): Summary of Job

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Now that you’ve properly formatted your resume and decided on the information to include, it’s time to get down to business and write what you’ve done at each job.

This part is trickier than it sounds. There are two things you have to remember when summarizing your experiences: use bullet points (three to four) for what you did without making it seem like a list of duties and make sure that the description explains why you did it and how it benefited the company – all in one to two sentences.

Here are some rules to follow when summarizing job experiences in your resume:

1) Don’t Make it Sound Like a Job Description:

Your goal is to form a resume that is interesting to read. No employer wants to read a list of job duties. For example, don’t just put: “Stocked shelves”, “Helped customers with purchases”, “Input data on Excel spreadsheet”. This is boring and doesn’t describe the type of person you are or your capabilities and work ethic. Which brings us to the next point…

2) Explain Why You Performed those Duties and How it Helped the Company:

Go beyond listing your job duties and explain how it was beneficial to your (previous) employer. For example, if the majority of your duties was customer service, say something like: “Built professional relationships with customers by recommending products based on their needs which resulted in an increase of returning customers.”

This description isn’t a run-on sentence and it hits all the important points. You performed the job because you had to help customers with the store’s products and understood different people have different needs. You also formed professional relationships, which shows you did more than just answer customer questions. Finally, all your responsibilities led to satisfied customers.

3) Use keywords:

Recruiters and hiring managers receive so many resumes a day that they spend less than 20 seconds going over, (or rather skimming) your resume. When they do this, they’re often looking for the keywords that they’ve placed in the job ad or words related to the position. Make sure you clearly read the job ad. Pick out the important words that are relevant to the position and use those words in your resume.

4) Include numbers and achievements:

Numbers speak volumes on your resume so use them when you can – the higher the better. For example, if you worked in sales, there are many numbers you can use. If there was a sales quota you had to meet, use the weekly quota instead of the daily one because it’s a higher number: “Successfully met weekly sales quota of $10,000 and increased monthly sales by 40%.” Numbers are proof of your work ethic and performance.