Dealing With Difficult People

Dealing With Difficult People

 

Some people are pretty easy to get along with and others, how shall we say this – aren’t.

 

There are people who, no matter what you do, just aren’t very pleasant to have as roommates or co-workers or bosses. Since they exist, you need to be able to handle them. Here are some methods for dealing with difficult people.

 

Don’t try to change their minds

 

No matter how much you might think you are a shining example of what every human should be, some people are simply not going to like you. Some people are just going to be rude to you. And some people will be all out mean.

 

You didn’t do anything wrong, it’s not a fundamental flaw in your character, it’s just something that happens, so file these people away in your head as difficult, and move on.

 

There are a couple of things to remember here. One, don’t let their behavior get to you. Two don’t bother wasting your time to correcting their misconceptions. Don’t go out of your way to please these people, or work tirelessly to get on their good side. You’re wasting your effort. If you want to do something nice for someone, pick someone out of the reams of people who already like you.

 

Be secure enough not to need the approval of everyone. Just tolerate the difficult ones, be polite, and move on.  If you’re consistently excellent at what you do, they’ll come around. Or maybe they won’t. But it doesn’t matter because what they think of you isn’t your business.

 

Don’t get trapped in pointless arguments

 

Sometimes difficult people will start arguments for no reason aside from the fact that they like to turn everything into an argument. If you find yourself constantly arguing with certain people learn to disengage. Don’t waste your time or your breath trying to convince to sway them to your viewpoint. You are only allotted so much energy per day. Don’t waste it on pointless, winless endeavors.

 

Don’t be a doormat to them

If the difficult person in your orbit begins to move past being merely a jerk and it turns into straight up harassment, it’s no longer time to not engage. At that point you need to stand up for yourself and let a superior or a person of authority know about inappropriate behaviour.

 

There is a difference between learning to let difficult people’s rudeness roll off you, and allowing yourself to be truly abused by someone because you want to take the high road.

 

Difficult people are going to come into your life. Learn to deal with them and the difficulty will be passing.

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Tip Tuesday: Intern or Volunteer After Graduation

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Don’t beat yourself up if you haven’t found a job after graduation yet. Many recent grads are in the same boat as you. To pass the time and make it worthwhile, intern or volunteer somewhere that will help you gain experience and make connections in the industry you desire. Even if it’s unpaid, at least you are developing the skills and general work experience that will count for something on your resume.

Resume Writing for Beginners (Pt 3): Summary of Job

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Now that you’ve properly formatted your resume and decided on the information to include, it’s time to get down to business and write what you’ve done at each job.

This part is trickier than it sounds. There are two things you have to remember when summarizing your experiences: use bullet points (three to four) for what you did without making it seem like a list of duties and make sure that the description explains why you did it and how it benefited the company – all in one to two sentences.

Here are some rules to follow when summarizing job experiences in your resume:

1) Don’t Make it Sound Like a Job Description:

Your goal is to form a resume that is interesting to read. No employer wants to read a list of job duties. For example, don’t just put: “Stocked shelves”, “Helped customers with purchases”, “Input data on Excel spreadsheet”. This is boring and doesn’t describe the type of person you are or your capabilities and work ethic. Which brings us to the next point…

2) Explain Why You Performed those Duties and How it Helped the Company:

Go beyond listing your job duties and explain how it was beneficial to your (previous) employer. For example, if the majority of your duties was customer service, say something like: “Built professional relationships with customers by recommending products based on their needs which resulted in an increase of returning customers.”

This description isn’t a run-on sentence and it hits all the important points. You performed the job because you had to help customers with the store’s products and understood different people have different needs. You also formed professional relationships, which shows you did more than just answer customer questions. Finally, all your responsibilities led to satisfied customers.

3) Use keywords:

Recruiters and hiring managers receive so many resumes a day that they spend less than 20 seconds going over, (or rather skimming) your resume. When they do this, they’re often looking for the keywords that they’ve placed in the job ad or words related to the position. Make sure you clearly read the job ad. Pick out the important words that are relevant to the position and use those words in your resume.

4) Include numbers and achievements:

Numbers speak volumes on your resume so use them when you can – the higher the better. For example, if you worked in sales, there are many numbers you can use. If there was a sales quota you had to meet, use the weekly quota instead of the daily one because it’s a higher number: “Successfully met weekly sales quota of $10,000 and increased monthly sales by 40%.” Numbers are proof of your work ethic and performance.

Tip Tuesday: Spring/Summer Work Attire

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It’s getting warmer and you know what that means…spring and summer work attire!
 
But don’t wear just anything to work. Just like we’ve been preaching from the start,
keep it professional. Avoid wearing pants higher than your knees or tops with spaghetti
straps to work.
 
Instead, ladies who choose to wear sleeveless shirts should make sure
it covers the whole shoulder. For pants, capris or loose sundresses/skirts
are also appropriate.
 
Men should wear golf shirts instead of t-shirts.
 
Enjoy the sun!

Job Fact Friday: Apply for Jobs Through Mobile

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Our world is moving at a million miles a minute – mobile apps are actually becoming an norm of job applications!  More and more companies have begun to design their websites to be cellphone-friendly and encourage their applicants to do it right from their phones! Resume, cover letter and actual application all from the tiny screen of your cell, how weird is that?